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Content Hub

CSR NEWS: OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2015

Laura Quinn

By Anant Shrivastava

Created by Diego Naïve, from the Noun Project

Created by Diego Naïve, from the Noun Project

BSE CSR platform ‘Samman’ to launch finally?

According to this Hindu article, the platform which has been talked about since April 2015 and aims to connect companies with NGOs to facilitate both parties in undertaking social activities using CSR funding will go live before the end of this year. It will certainly be useful for companies to find credible, transparent organizations and programmes of interest to be funded. However, NGOs that cannot/do not get themselves listed on the platform stand at a risk of not being funded. We hope companies are open-minded while looking for programmes to fund and don’t limit themselves to just the thousand or so organisations that will be listed on Samman.

Companies Act may be amended for clarity on CSR norms

Based on the recommendations submitted by the Government appointed Baijal Committee in September, certain rules as well as the Act could be changed to allow greater transparency around CSR spending. The panel is expected to submit the final report to the MCA in December. Changes are expected to provide greater clarity on many ambiguous areas of the CSR rules including the differential tax treatment of various forms of CSR expenditure as mentioned in this Business-Standard article. In the present scenario where the rules are vague in places and left open to interpretation, such an amendment should prove to be beneficial for all stakeholders in the game.

India ranks no.1 on CSR reporting (but there’s more to it in the fine print..)

India tops the world in CSR reporting with 100% of its top 100 companies reporting on their CSR initiatives. While this is good news, it is hardly surprising given that the government mandates companies above a certain size to report on CSR activities. What is worrying though is the quality of reporting – something where India lags behind many countries. According to this Livemint article, it’s clear that corporate India still has a long way to go before it starts to produce high quality responsibility reporting especially issues such as carbon emissions. Perhaps decisions taken in the ongoing CoP 21 in Paris will distill down to corporate India and make them realize the importance of accurate and high quality sustainability reporting. Only time will tell.

State govt. requests CSR funds for tribal development

Maharashtra CM Devendra Fadnavis requested corporates to utilize CSR funds for the benefit of the tribal population of Maharashtra. This is a good example of government identifying the challenges that can then be addressed by corporate India through CSR funding. However we’ve stressed this before and would like to say this again – participation in such govt. led initiatives should be voluntary and unwillingness on companies’ part to contribute for such initiatives should not come at a cost or penalization in any way.

Transparency for CSR funds should be a two way street

Companies often go to great lengths to ensure that the NGO partners they work with are transparent, ethical, and corruption free organisations. This involves a rigorous due diligence process and rightly so as there are many NGOs that are corrupt and end up utilising CSR funds for vested interests. But shouldn’t the companies be transparent as well when it comes to their expectations from NGOs, processes for grant giving etc. to help NGOs apply for funding? This article written by the development director of a hospital describes the tedious and unnecessary process NGOs often have to go through to just gather information about available corporate funding. We feel that just as NGOs need to step up their game and become professional in order to secure funding, companies also need to structure their grant giving mechanisms efficiently to benefit the NGOs and ultimately the society in the most efficient way. 

Mark Kramer on why a philanthropic model of CSR has limited benefits

Mark Kramer, co-founder and Managing Director of consultancy FSG, stressed in an interview the limitations of a purely philanthropic model and talks about the need for a profit-driven business model for addressing social issues. We agree entirely that, although the traditional CSR model can help to address social problems, there is a critical need to look at social issues from a business perspective. A commercial angle brings greater accountability, professionalism, and often, better resources to tackle challenges than a purely charity-based approach.

Social mission and profit are not mutually exclusive, even for startups

India is on its way to becoming a startup hub (if it’s not there already). But not many startups have a clear social mission or ‘purpose’. The reason is often that they are too busy focusing on other vital aspects of business like, well, starting up! But social consciousness can and should be a part of business strategy for start-ups from day one. Plenty of studies exist to show that a social agenda adds to long term profitability of a company. The same applies to start-ups as well. This article tells the story of how Warby Parker, an online glasses retailer, was able to derive success by being a socially responsible company from the beginning.

Tying CSR with climate change

The climate change conference in Paris in November and December, aimed at helping around 196 nations make decisions on mitigating climate change, is expected to be followed by significant policy changes at national and global levels. Implementation of such policies will come at an added cost that will be borne by multiple stakeholders including governments and the corporate sector. How can the government and companies work together to utilise the mandatory CSR spending to ensure maximum positive environmental impact? A Didar Singh, the secretary general of FICCI, provides insights in this article.

PSUs fare better than private sector in Oxfam’s IRBF 2015 index

Oxfam Foundation released the India Responsible Business Index in October that measures the BSE top 100 companies’ on voluntary disclosures and policy commitments against the National Voluntary Guidelines (NVGs). According to this index, PSUs are doing better than private sector on criteria such as non-discrimination at workplace, community development, respecting human rights and employee dignity, and involving the community as stakeholders in business. The only area where private companies fare better is instituting sustainable policies in their supply chain. We think that initiatives like this that put out such information in the public domain have an effect of motivating companies to do more on sustainability and reporting front. For complete information on IRBF, visit http://www.responsiblebiz.org/